Skip to content
({{search.Data.length}} results)
{{settings.Localization.Data.SearchResult.EmptySearchResultSuggestion}}

We use cookies. Close message to approve. Show more information

{{settingsInstance.Localization.Data.Cookies.Title}}

  • Photographer: katja_ragnstam

Dyröleden - Walking with the wild sheep on Dyrön

Enjoy the Bohuslän countryside along more than four kilometres of the beautiful footpath around the island of Dyrön. There are magnificent views to the west of Marstrandsfjorden with Carlstens Fortress in the background, Pater Noster and Åstol, just as there are to the east toward Risön, Hättan and Hakefjorden.

Small island, big scenery

The island of Dyrön lies between Marstrand and Tjörn in southern Bohuslän. The easiest way to get to the island is with the passenger ferry from Rönnäng, on the southern tip of Tjörn. Dyröleden is the footpath that takes you around the idyllic island, with its varied, dramatic landscapes. The inhabited centre is in a valley between the north and south harbours. The valley is flanked on either side by bare, rocky landscapes with ravines and hollows. There are six places where you can join the footpath, so it is easy for you to decide how far you want to walk. It takes a little less than an hour and a half to walk all around the island, but you should take the time to enjoy a cup of coffee, read the information boards or just stand and stare.... enjoy the views.

Photographer: Anders Jonsson

 

Ravines, mouflon sheep and wild plants

One of the most special places along Dyröleden is Dynes Ravine, a narrow passage between two high rock walls. There is a wooden deck at the bottom of the ravine with tables and benches, making it an ideal spot for coffee while admiring the view over Åstol. You may be lucky enough to see some wild mouflon sheep that roam freely on the island among the lush coppices and steep rocky outcrops. Those who are interested in botany will find many rare plants here. On the west side of the island you can look over the remains of a Stone Age village and a Bronze Age mound, and should you feel like a dip, the sandy beach near to the island's south harbour is recommended.

Photographer: Katja Ragnstam

 

Beautiful views in all directions

On the east side of the island you can take a detour up to the viewpoint at Grinneberget. During the war there was an anti-aircraft gun at the top, but now there is a barbecue, a picnic area and a lovely viewpoint with plenty of space for visitors. Another viewpoint toward the west, Åsen, offers a magnificent view with tables and benches for tired feet and legs. The fairway to Wallhamn and Stenungsund passes just south of Dyrön, so there are good chances of seeing big ships sailing just a few hundred metres in front of you.

Photographer: Katja Ragnstam

 

Well-marked footpaths

Half-metre high poles and emergency poles clearly show how to follow the footpath. Places to join the footpath are also clearly marked with signs. Information boards along the footpath describe the various sites and their history. Tables and benches have been put in a number of strategic places where you can have a picnic or just sit down to relax for a while. Dyröleden is hilly and may be slippery in the rain, so proper walking shoes or boots are recommended. Steps, bridges and handrails have been installed at the most difficult parts of the path to make walking easier and safer.